How to prevent frozen pipes.
Prevent freezing of these water supply lines and pipes by following these recommendations:

1. Drain water from swimming pool and water sprinkler supply lines following manufacturer's or installer's directions. Do not put antifreeze in these lines unless directed. Antifreeze is environmentally harmful, and is dangerous to humans, pets, wildlife, and landscaping.
2. Remove, drain, and store hoses used outdoors. Close inside valves supplying outdoor hose bibs. Open the outside hose bibs to allow water to drain. Keep the outside valve open so that any water remaining in the pipe can expand without causing the pipe to break.
3. Check around the home for other areas where water supply lines are located in unheated areas. Look in the basement, crawl space, attic, garage, and under kitchen and bathroom cabinets. Both hot and cold water pipes in these areas should be insulated.
4. Consider installing specific products made to insulate water pipes like a "pipe sleeve" or installing UL-listed "heat tape," "heat cable," or similar materials on exposed water pipes. Newspaper can provide some degree of insulation and protection to exposed pipes – even ¼” of newspaper can provide significant protection in areas that usually do not have frequent or prolonged temperatures below freezing.
5. Keep garage doors closed if there are water supply lines in the garage.
6. Open kitchen and bathroom cabinet doors to allow warmer air to circulate around the plumbing. Be sure to move any harmful cleaners and household chemicals up out of the reach of children.
7. When the weather is very cold outside, let the cold water drip from the faucet served by exposed pipes. Running water through the pipe - even at a trickle - helps prevent pipes from freezing.
8. Keep the thermostat set to the same temperature both during the day and at night. By temporarily suspending the use of lower nighttime temperatures, you may incur a higher heating bill, but you can prevent a much more costly repair job if pipes freeze and burst.
9. If you will be going away during cold weather, leave the heat on in your home, set to a temperature no lower than 55° F.

Show All Answers

1. Why do my pipes bang or why do I have low pressure?
2. Why does my water smell like kerosene, cat urine or sulfur?
3. My water smells like chlorine/bleach. Are there a lot of chemicals or extra chlorine in the water?
4. Why do my toilets and sinks have black or pink rings or spots on them?
5. Why is my water discolored or muddy looking?
6. Why does my water look milky white?
7. Why do my pipes freeze?
8. How to prevent frozen pipes.
9. How to thaw pipes if they are frozen.
10. What is the hardness of my water?
11. Do you add fluoride to the water?
12. What happens if the sewer backs up? What can you do?
13. How do I tell if my sanitary sewer problem is in my house plumbing or in the public sanitary sewer main?
14. If my sewer backs up, is it my responsibility to pay for it?
15. How can I avoid future backups?
16. Check your cleanout.
17. I think I have a leak, what do I do?
18. I am moving. What is needed to end my water service?
19. I am moving. What is needed to start my water service?
20. Who do I contact about backflow prevention or conservation?
21. How do I know my water is safe to drink?
22. Where does our water come from?